Premiere: String Theory by AfterLife | Out 6th of July on Subatomic…

When thinking Balearic, there is a name that should strike you right away. No, not Ibiza itself, but the man responsible for producing and curating some of the lushest sunset music the White Island has ever heard – Steve Miller, perhaps most commonly known as Afterlife. Making a name for himself in the early 2000’s by playing monumental events such as Glastonbury, headlining Cafe Del Mar’s 20th anniversary party and reaching the top of the UK charts by remixing Another Chance from Roger Sanchez, he’s managed a consistency unlike many others in the decade and a half since.

Releasing standout classic albums such as “Simplicity Two Thousand” and “Speck of Gold”, his music has been released on the premiere labels of the time, such as Hed Kandi and Defected, while also being featured on numerous compilations to date. Not only is he a master of his craft, but he’s also managed to attract some of the best in the business to work with him, namely K-Klass, Jose Padilla, Chris Coco and an almost inconceivable amount of others. Lately, Steve has shifted his output to his own record label, Subatomic UK, averaging an album release every two years over the past six years.

Not looking to break that pattern, we’re happy to announce that Afterlife is back with another full length offering entitled “String Theory”. This time, Miller seems to shed a bit more of the White Isle in his productions, with the album presenting a deeper, more introspective angle of his musical prowess. As per usual, plenty of different influences are to be found within, from the impeccable flamenco-inspired tremolo guitar of the title track to the driving rhythm and vivid textures of Give It Up, there is not a single flaw to be found. The album is diverse yet remarkably coherent, rightfully demonstrating why Afterlife is a name that hasn’t faded for 20 years.

This time Afterlife looks to build a bridge to the dance floor, with a pair of remixes released on a 12” with one of the lead singles ahead of the album. ‘Give It Up’ gets the treatment from two of the underground’s current finest. WOLF Music’s Medlar changes up the percussion and gives it a more tropical flare, all the while using the main arpeggiated elements of the original, adding his own airy synth work and groovy bassline that’s just bound to set dancefloors on fire. The second rework comes from Futureboogie’s mainstay Christophe. Choosing to work with atmospheric strings and vocals, this version utilizes plenty of the producer’s own groovy ingredients. Managing to inject some funk into his take, the bassline and disco toms give it a fresh, playful vibe that pleasantly contrasts the original.
The remix 12” is set to hit shops first as a teaser to the full product in mid -June with the album following closely behind.

 

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eclec0100 | Ty | Take Me Back Mix | 06|05|18

Summer’s here so time to warm up – This mix recalls those recent summers past.

Originally from Manchester, Ty started out as just an avid collector firstly finding his feet as a kid in the 80’s before discovering house and early rave to hip hop and funk and so on and so on.

Music has given him the opportunity to play at various venues and festivals across the UK and the odd spot on pirate radio!

Before the disco revival, his love of disco led him to setting up and promoting the absurdly named and popular night Disco Magico Sexy Sexy Bang Bang!

You can catch him fortnightly Sundays on 1BTN.fm – No fixed genre or agenda. Expect anything from world music, house, disco, funk, and tropical with the odd pop gem thrown in.

Boarder Pass by James Rod [ec0005] 11|01|18.

As the nights draw in and the temperature drops, eclectics return with a brace of winter warmers, courtesy of James Rod, both of which are packing enough heat to keep us cosy until the clocks go forward.

Boarder Pass is cosmic disco with a casual nod to Norway in the loose-limbed stomp as the bass and drums rise and fall into place with calm confidence.

The synth sound is so warm it’s like they’ve been rendered in pastels by a man in a sweater by an open fire. There’s no soporific after effect though, the high arpeggios and throbbing bass see to that. This tune is headed for the dance floor, it’s just sorting out the underfloor heating first.

‘Back to Casiopea’ shares similar feel, but with the urgency turned up. Shards of guitar ricochet off the glacier walls provided by the synths, which give us a structure that’s familiar yet unknown – like finding an outtake of Patrick Cowley producing Tangerine Dream or digging out an hitherto unseen John Carpenter project and realising that it has a previously unheard soundtrack to kill for.

In fact, Cowley and Carpenter are key touchstones. There’s a live feel to these tracks that accentuates the human element. This may be machine music on first reading, but it oozes soul, bleeds spirit, and that comes from a composer who understands perfectly how to place himself at the centre of it all.-Jah Shabby.

You can listen here for yourself… x